Skipping Breakfast

I don’t know if many other people are like me, but I’m usually not hungry in the morning, in fact eating at all in the first three or so hours after waking up just makes me feel nauseous. But I eat breakfast anyway because that’s how I was raised; whenever I said I didn’t feel hungry and only wanted something to drink I was subjected to a lecture about how “breakfast is the most important meal of the day”, a point which would be reiterated until I gave in and ate something.

In more recent years I’ve been seeing an interesting little factoid thrown around; that skipping breakfast makes you fat, the logic being that not having breakfast makes you more likely to eat more in later meals. I recently found out where this came from; a study into the habits of people who have maintained significant weight loss found that eight out of ten of them eat breakfast every day.

After a further ten seconds on google I found that one in five adults regularly skip breakfast, i.e. there is no significant difference in the rate of breakfast consumption between those who have maintained significant weight loss and the general population, the majority of which, according to the statistics, are overweight.

This is just bad science and laziness; not only did they not investigate the effects of skipping breakfast before making the claim, they didn’t even check if this behaviour deviated from the average. So I’m not going to worry about breakfast anymore, I’ll eat it if I wake up hungry, but most of the time that’s not the case. At least until I see any real evidence on the matter.

Biscuit vs. Cookie

The word biscuit derives from the Old French term bescuit, which itself derives from the Latin for “twice cooked”.

The word cookie derives from from the Dutch term koekje, which is the diminutive form of koek, meaning “cake”.

Whilst the debate on the use of these terms has more to do with cultural differences than language, I believe that anything referred to as a biscuit should be brittle & dry and anything referred to as a cookie should be soft & moist.

Therefore; these are biscuits…

…and these are cookies.

I always thought I’d be a Ravenclaw.

Having read the books, it just seemed like the house which would fit me best, though I’d never given it a lot of thought. More out of curiosity than anything, I signed up for Pottermore, having heard good things about it.

Then this happened.

image

Hooray for a year of sporadic posts and wasted time!

Hooray for a year of sporadic posts and wasted time!

(Source: assets)

wolfkazumaru:

Sie müssen Substantive mit Großbuchstaben beginnen!

image

imageUNANNEHMBAR!

(Source: garmbreak1)

thephotogfeminist:

doctordonna10:

castielsunderpants:

mattykeehl:

gallifrey-feels:

echoingdaydreams:

dandeleijons:

mrdecomposition:

i-wanted-to-rp-so-i:

wholocked-me-in-my-mindpalace:

improbablenormality:

johnisnothisdate:

catatonicconundrum:

adolfi:

Hitler flirting with Eva Braun.

I don’t know how this makes me feel

It makes me feel very uncomfortable

You know what’s so uncomfortable about this? It shows that perhaps one of the most evil men in history, was a human being. That, on occasion, he could be nice, even flirty. That’s not all. You want to see evil people as evil, screaming horrible stuff over a desk with 20 microphones with 20, 000 people saluting them. The evil is clear and recognizable then. This shows a completely different image, it scares you because that means that evil isn’t a stereotype, that evil is not recognizable, that evil could be anyone. It scares you because this shows that could be lurking inside anyone and you’ll never ever know. Maybe in you? 

i reblogged this literally like 2 minutes ago, but i want this version because of that comment ^

That comment is one of my favorite post commentaries, because it’s completely right. People aren’t inherently evil. Like good, it’s a role they grow and live into. We have just as much potential to destroy as this man exhibited. And it’s a very eye opening experience to realize that.

does anyone even remember that one time hitler attended that luncheon between world leaders, some guests of which even included china’s socialist leader as well as Stalin. And then when they were ordering, everyone was gladly ordering impressive dishes one after the other, but Hitler placed an order for barley tea and a pheasant (considered a peasant’s meal by standard). When he was questioned as to why he would order something like this in something as grand as a world leader’s congress, he replied,

“I don’t smoke when my people cannot smoke, and I cannot eat when my people are going hungry.”

He wasn’t evil for its own sake, let’s try to remember that despite the countless murders, but for a moment, he did actually believe he was doing something for the good of his countrymen.

WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU PEOPLE

No, he’s right. Hitler, though extremely wrong in his views, did everything for what he thought would better the lives of his people. It was wrong. It was disgustingly, horribly wrong. But he did not do it because it was evil and he was evil. He did it because he believed it would help Germany and those who needed a better life. Those who don’t understand or even try to understand the human brain will always label men like him as ‘evil’ because it is easier to accept. But he wasn’t ‘evil.’ He felt love and loyalty and responsibilities. He simply took these aspects and morphed them into a twisted, violent thing. 

A perfectly human monster.

(Source: axishistory, via clementmoraschi)

Reasons I’m a Misanthrope (Part 1)

Now that I am working at a different site I can no longer use public transport in my commute, as such I have bought a car, a small, reliable and fuel-efficient thing. I had managed to avoid driving for four years and now, one hundred miles into car ownership, I remember why:

People are arseholes.

If it’s not people who seem completely oblivious as to the presence and function of indicators (both their own and those of other drivers), it’s people who attempt to overtake when there’s someone coming the other way, forcing both to brake and/or swerve dangerously.

If it’s not those, it’s people who overtake on a blind corner, risking writing off all three cars (and more if there’s people behind), and the death of everyone in those cars.

If it’s not those, it’s people who, not happy to travel at the legal speed limit, drive dangerously close to the back of your car in an attempt to make you speed, instead of simply overtaking, so much so that even if their car were fitted with that automatic system that applies the brakes if you are about to crash, would not be able to avoid running into you if you had to slow down for any reason, like a bend in the road.

All of this happened to me in a single thirty minute period this morning. Multiple times.

My car needs a grenade launcher…

idlnmclean:

dirigiblejousting:

twofingerswhiskey:

nightmarebc:

satanhasclaimedthisblog:

anewwhovian:

Okay so, the Doctor is from out of space but does he only breathe oxygen like everyone else? Does Gallifrey have an atmosphere like Earth’s? Because I’d never thought about it before now but he seems to be struggling just as much as everyone else and he does seem to have the same basic anatomy as a human, other than the two hearts. 
Anyone care to answer?

Gallifrey’s atmosphere is 77% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen and 2% other, which means that it’s similar to Earth’s atmosphere, but it’s a bit thinner. The Doctor needs oxygen as well, but Time Lords have a raspiratory bypass system that allows them to go without breathing for a longer time span than humans.

Most fandoms have some pretty deep canon. The Doctor Who fandom can tell you the concentrations of gas in the atmosphere of the home planet of the main character. DW Fandom > Your fandom

This also means that Earth’s atmosphere gets the Doctor high, because it has double (or triple, I can’t do math, forgive me) the oxygen of Gallifrey. Obviously the TARDIS has an Earth-like oxygen level inside of it, which can explain why he’s so bloody hyper all the time.

Earth’s atmosphere is 20.946% oxygen by volume, or 21% if we’re sticking with integers.
This is exactly the same as the fictional planet Gallifrey.
So yeah, you can’t do maths. At all.

Density and pressure matters. Thin atmosphere like up in the mountains of Earth vs thick atmosphere like at sea level on Earth or on the ground of Venus. If he’s from a planet with the same proportion of gaseous elements as Earth but not the same atmospheric pressure then he can in fact get high from Earth’s atmosphere especially if he has similarities to marine mammals in his ability to concentrate oxygen in the muscle tissues of his body. Like say his two hearts.

True, however that’s the first time pressure has come into this. I had assumed from context, not unreasonably, that concentration was being referred to.
From some cursory research I have found that Gallifrey is supposed to be 4 times the diameter of Earth. Assuming the same average density, this would give Gallifrey 16 times the mass of Earth and so 16 times the surface gravity, resulting in a higher atmospheric pressure at sea level.
However, such a large planet is likely to be denser, for example the largest rocky planet discovered which I know of is twice Earth’s diameter but 5 times the mass. So the planet will have more mass and the surface gravity will be greater still. This will result in even higher atmospheric pressure and so even greater availability of oxygen.
The Doctor wouldn’t get high on Earth, he’d be hypoxic.

idlnmclean:

dirigiblejousting:

twofingerswhiskey:

nightmarebc:

satanhasclaimedthisblog:

anewwhovian:

Okay so, the Doctor is from out of space but does he only breathe oxygen like everyone else? Does Gallifrey have an atmosphere like Earth’s? Because I’d never thought about it before now but he seems to be struggling just as much as everyone else and he does seem to have the same basic anatomy as a human, other than the two hearts. 

Anyone care to answer?

Gallifrey’s atmosphere is 77% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen and 2% other, which means that it’s similar to Earth’s atmosphere, but it’s a bit thinner.
The Doctor needs oxygen as well, but Time Lords have a raspiratory bypass system that allows them to go without breathing for a longer time span than humans.

Most fandoms have some pretty deep canon. The Doctor Who fandom can tell you the concentrations of gas in the atmosphere of the home planet of the main character. DW Fandom > Your fandom

This also means that Earth’s atmosphere gets the Doctor high, because it has double (or triple, I can’t do math, forgive me) the oxygen of Gallifrey. Obviously the TARDIS has an Earth-like oxygen level inside of it, which can explain why he’s so bloody hyper all the time.

Earth’s atmosphere is 20.946% oxygen by volume, or 21% if we’re sticking with integers.

This is exactly the same as the fictional planet Gallifrey.

So yeah, you can’t do maths. At all.

Density and pressure matters. Thin atmosphere like up in the mountains of Earth vs thick atmosphere like at sea level on Earth or on the ground of Venus. If he’s from a planet with the same proportion of gaseous elements as Earth but not the same atmospheric pressure then he can in fact get high from Earth’s atmosphere especially if he has similarities to marine mammals in his ability to concentrate oxygen in the muscle tissues of his body. Like say his two hearts.

True, however that’s the first time pressure has come into this. I had assumed from context, not unreasonably, that concentration was being referred to.

From some cursory research I have found that Gallifrey is supposed to be 4 times the diameter of Earth. Assuming the same average density, this would give Gallifrey 16 times the mass of Earth and so 16 times the surface gravity, resulting in a higher atmospheric pressure at sea level.

However, such a large planet is likely to be denser, for example the largest rocky planet discovered which I know of is twice Earth’s diameter but 5 times the mass. So the planet will have more mass and the surface gravity will be greater still. This will result in even higher atmospheric pressure and so even greater availability of oxygen.

The Doctor wouldn’t get high on Earth, he’d be hypoxic.

twofingerswhiskey:

nightmarebc:

satanhasclaimedthisblog:

anewwhovian:

Okay so, the Doctor is from out of space but does he only breathe oxygen like everyone else? Does Gallifrey have an atmosphere like Earth’s? Because I’d never thought about it before now but he seems to be struggling just as much as everyone else and he does seem to have the same basic anatomy as a human, other than the two hearts. 
Anyone care to answer?

Gallifrey’s atmosphere is 77% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen and 2% other, which means that it’s similar to Earth’s atmosphere, but it’s a bit thinner. The Doctor needs oxygen as well, but Time Lords have a raspiratory bypass system that allows them to go without breathing for a longer time span than humans.

Most fandoms have some pretty deep canon. The Doctor Who fandom can tell you the concentrations of gas in the atmosphere of the home planet of the main character. DW Fandom > Your fandom

This also means that Earth’s atmosphere gets the Doctor high, because it has double (or triple, I can’t do math, forgive me) the oxygen of Gallifrey. Obviously the TARDIS has an Earth-like oxygen level inside of it, which can explain why he’s so bloody hyper all the time.

Earth’s atmosphere is 20.946% oxygen by volume, or 21% if we’re sticking with integers.
This is exactly the same as the fictional planet Gallifrey.
So yeah, you can’t do maths. At all.

twofingerswhiskey:

nightmarebc:

satanhasclaimedthisblog:

anewwhovian:

Okay so, the Doctor is from out of space but does he only breathe oxygen like everyone else? Does Gallifrey have an atmosphere like Earth’s? Because I’d never thought about it before now but he seems to be struggling just as much as everyone else and he does seem to have the same basic anatomy as a human, other than the two hearts. 

Anyone care to answer?

Gallifrey’s atmosphere is 77% Nitrogen, 21% Oxygen and 2% other, which means that it’s similar to Earth’s atmosphere, but it’s a bit thinner.
The Doctor needs oxygen as well, but Time Lords have a raspiratory bypass system that allows them to go without breathing for a longer time span than humans.

Most fandoms have some pretty deep canon. The Doctor Who fandom can tell you the concentrations of gas in the atmosphere of the home planet of the main character. DW Fandom > Your fandom

This also means that Earth’s atmosphere gets the Doctor high, because it has double (or triple, I can’t do math, forgive me) the oxygen of Gallifrey. Obviously the TARDIS has an Earth-like oxygen level inside of it, which can explain why he’s so bloody hyper all the time.

Earth’s atmosphere is 20.946% oxygen by volume, or 21% if we’re sticking with integers.

This is exactly the same as the fictional planet Gallifrey.

So yeah, you can’t do maths. At all.

It’s been a while since I posted anything… a long while… okay, I may have forgotten I even had an account…
Since it’s been so long I might as well post any old crap. This is a post-surgery X-ray on my ankle, the hospital only does digital X-rays, so I had to settle for a photo of the screen. It’s the better part of two years old, from when my university insisted that the ice covering every inch of the pavements was perfectly safe to walk on, whereas the fresh, fluffy, grippy snow of a week earlier had been too dangerous for anyone to come in to lectures. The key point there being that the snow had also been on the roads, making it unsafe for people with cars (the lecturers) to drive in, but was shovelled on to the pavements and crushed down into ice, clearing the roads, because fuck anyone who didn’t have a car (the students).
So I ended up with a spiral fracture of my fibula and an oblique fracture of my medial malleolus.

It’s been a while since I posted anything… a long while… okay, I may have forgotten I even had an account…

Since it’s been so long I might as well post any old crap. This is a post-surgery X-ray on my ankle, the hospital only does digital X-rays, so I had to settle for a photo of the screen. It’s the better part of two years old, from when my university insisted that the ice covering every inch of the pavements was perfectly safe to walk on, whereas the fresh, fluffy, grippy snow of a week earlier had been too dangerous for anyone to come in to lectures. The key point there being that the snow had also been on the roads, making it unsafe for people with cars (the lecturers) to drive in, but was shovelled on to the pavements and crushed down into ice, clearing the roads, because fuck anyone who didn’t have a car (the students).

So I ended up with a spiral fracture of my fibula and an oblique fracture of my medial malleolus.